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The Long Goodbye (1973)

The Long Goodbye cat poster.jpg

I love Elliott Gould. Have done since first laying eyes on him when I was, oh, probably, nine years old. And I love cats. So even if I didn’t love this movie, I’d love the poster (there are several but this is my 500th blog entry so I chose my favourite). And this has inhabited my mental landscape since that age. It’s funny, it’s smart, it’s an amazingly daring adaptation of Chandler, whose books I adore, it’s done by the great Leigh Brackett (and I was so happy to discover this was a woman) and Robert Altman (who took up the offer to direct when both Hawks and Bogdanovich turned it down. The fools). The title song, which I had presumed was an old movie song, was composed for this by John Williams and Johnny Mercer and reappears in many guises as commentary in the narrative. It’s updated to the Seventies and set in Los Angeles, a city that I love. It’s about Hollywood. It’s about a suicidal alcoholic  writer whose resemblance to Hemingway is overwhelming.  He’s played by controversial actor Sterling Hayden, who was off his rocker throughout shooting. And he’s married to Nina Van Pallandt of Nina & Frederik fame (look them up). The scenes at their beachside home were shot at Altman’s place in Malibu. It’s also about a crazy violent guy played by director Mark Rydell. And it’s about what you find yourself doing when your friend double-crosses you. And it’s about a private eye who needs to find food for his cat late at night. It was completely misunderstood upon initial release, withdrawn and re-released months later with the second poster (below):  ah, said the critics! Now we get it!  Or some of them did. It looks beautiful, like California always ought to look, thanks to Vilmos Zsigmond. It’s one of the reasons I love movies. Everyone has their own Philip Marlowe. This is mine.

The Long Goodbye Mad Jack Davis poster.jpg

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About elainelennon

An occasional movie-watching diary.

2 responses to “The Long Goodbye (1973)

  1. One of my favorite neo-noirs! Robert Altman took classic noir and turned it upside down. Elliott Gould’s disheveled P.I. is so much fun. And, yes, Vilmos Zsigmond’s cinematography is brilliant. A great, great film!

  2. Glad to meet another person of impeccable taste! Your site is awesome, by the way.

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