Posted on

Run Wild, Run Free (1969)

Run Wild, Run Free poster.jpg

Beautifully made nature film shot in Dartmoor. What more do you need? Extraordinary child actor Mark Lester is the (selectively as it turns out) mute boy whose parents Gordon Jackson and Sylvia Syms are at their wits’ end trying to figure out how to handle him when retired colonel and moorman John Mills helps him get acquainted with a stray white colt and his life is transformed as he has something to care about other than himself. Fiona Fullerton is his friend from a nearby farm and together they set out to tame the horse. It runs off and Lester makes do with a lovely kestrel until … bad things happen. Brilliant as Lester is, it doesn’t quite resolve the problem that the viewer might have of wanting quite frankly to beat his nonsense out of him. (Autism is not my bailiwick, dear reader.)  Lester had achieved fame by playing a child with a stutter in Our Mother’s House which led to his being cast in Oliver! The lustrous Syms is a little complicated if not outright neurotic (wouldn’t we all be with a son like that) and Mills gets to do his abject masculinity thing at the end when we narrowly avert a tragedy. However it’s generally a lovely piece of work about the issues around problem children, country life, the incredible light an animal can bring into your life (thank you, gods) and it’s excellently directed on location by Richard C. Sarafian. It’s fabulously shot by Wilkie Cooper and  adapted from the novel The White Colt by David Rook.  I hadn’t seen this since I was a child myself and I got a lot out of it. It is of course about taming children and perhaps nowadays we understand more about animals and their therapeutic roles in our lives …  Mind you, this child does dreadful things to them. Mills and Syms were of course previously seen together in the fantastic Ice Cold in Alex (so that final scene with Mills … is deja vu all over again!) This was Bernard Miles’ last big screen appearance.

Advertisements

About elainelennon

An occasional movie-watching diary.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s