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Interlude (1957)

Interlude poster.jpg

What does anyone see in June Allyson? Goodness knows, but she was the go-to wife next door for the 1950s and Rossano Brazzi was the go-to exotic Romeo in any number of films featuring WASPy women looking for a bit of rumpy-pumpy away from home. James Cain’s story had already been adapted and filmed by John M.Stahl but here it’s German auteur Douglas Sirk on directing duties, returning to home turf, with Allyson as a reporter taking a job at an American cultural mission in Munich. She meets up with an American doctor, Morley, who is very keen on her – but not as keen as she is on the troubled symphony conductor who charms her and takes her on a spin in his sports car to Salzburg and then to his lake house … After spending the night, she finds out that he is married. He literally has a madwoman in the attic, as it were. With a change in cinematographer (William Daniels) and location, Sirk focuses almost entirely on the workings of desire in all his characters. Stahl’s melodramas were rich resources for Sirk’s particular avocations, as we have seen in Magnificent Obsession and Imitation of Life, but this operates in a different, more clearly musical mode, as you’d expect in a classical melodrama – with contributions from Frank Skinner and Henry Mancini. You will recognise one piece of music from two of his other films of the period:  how many times did he use it?! Candice Bergen’s mother Frances plays the disapproving co-worker and Marianne Koch does a fine job as the wronged and crazy wife. And, y’know, grudging kudos to Allyson, playing girlish at 40. Jane Eyre on Tour in Yerp.

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About elainelennon

An occasional movie-watching diary.

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