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Elsa Martinelli 01/30/1935-07/08/2017

EM The Red and the Black.jpgEM The Indian Fighter.jpgEM Rice Girl.jpgEM Donatella.jpgEM Four Girls in Town.jpegEM Manuela.jpgEM Prisoner of the Volga.jpgEM Bad Girls Don't Cry.jpgEM Wild Cats on the Beach.jpgEM Tunis Top Secret.jpgEM Ciao Ciao Bambina.jpgEM Blood and Roses.jpgEM Captain Blood.jpgEM Love in Rome.jpgEM Pelle Viva.jpgEM La menace.jpgEM Hatari.jpgEM The Pigeon That Took Rome.jpgEM The Trial.jpgEM The VIPs.jpgEM Rampage.jpgEM All About Loving.jpgEM Je vous salue mafia.jpgEM Diamonds Are Brittle.jpgEM The 10th Victim.jpgEM Marco the MagnificentEM How I Learned to Love Women.jpgEM Maroc 7EM The Oldest ProfessionEM Woman Times SevenEM Manon 70.jpgEM The Belle Starr Story.jpgEM Madigans Millions.jpgEM Candy.jpgEM The Pleasure Pit.jpgEM Una sullaltra.jpgEM If Its Tuesday.jpegEM Lamica.jpgEM OSS 117.jpgEM The Lions Share.jpgEM I Am an ESP.jpg

EM Once Upon a Crime.jpgElsa Martinelli Vogue 1965.jpegElsa Martinelli Maroc 7.jpegElsa Martinelli Life cover.jpegElsa Martinelli and baby elephants.jpgElsa Martinelli Vogue 1955Elsa Martinelli make up

One of my favourite women has died. Elsa Martinelli was one of cinema’s real cool girls. Born Elisa Tia in Tuscany, she became a model at a very young age and was spotted by French director Claude Autant-Lara after she had a small role in an Italian anthology film and within a couple of years she did that rite of passage for all italian beauties – a rice film (Mangano and Loren did one too.) Kirk Douglas – who had a taste for fresh flesh – took her to Hollywood for The Indian Fighter but it wasn’t until she played Georgia in Roger Vadim’s perversely wonderful Blood and Roses (1960) (a 20th century update of le Fanu’s Carmilla) that she gained real star status. She had already done amazing work in Mauro Bolognini’s La notte brava (written by Pasolini) so she was by now an auteur favourite.   She played opposite Anthony Perkins in Orson Welles’ underrated interpretation of The Trial (1962) which he shot in Paris and then sent up her own image as Gloria Gritti in The VIPs (1963) – with Welles as the movie mogul to her petulant movie star. Then of course she was the fabulous Dallas in Hatari! (1963) a film that really exhibited her particular brand of Euro cool and of course that haircut framing such a defiantly modern look and determinedly independent character. Never mind that she wound up with John Wayne – just think of all those baby elephants!  That’s one of my desert island movies for sure. That look was what made me pay attention to her as a kid when I spotted her in the extremely bizarre and super fashionable Sixties crime movie Maroc 7 (1967) which was on TV now and then.  She was already out of her troubled marriage into the Roman aristocracy that had produced a daughter and she eventually married the brilliant photographer Willy Rizzo. She also became one of those weird Sixties hybrids – the actor-singer (there were a few of them, like Bardot and Birkin) and if you want to hear some truly mournful and striking chansons you can check her out on YouTube which has some of her TV recordings. She made a really great impression in The Belle Starr Story (1968), a rare western directed by a woman, Lina Wertmuller (who had to make it under a male pseudonym) and continued to appear opposite top Hollywood stars like Dustin Hoffman and even Raquel Welch! In between supporting roles and cameos in Hollywood travelogue comedy movies like If It’s Tuesday This Must Be Belgium and her final screen appearance Once Upon a Crime where she has a small cameo, she was a definite part of the fabled jet set and there are many snaps of her partying with people like Ari Onassis. Latterly she was in a number of TV series, both German and Italian, with her last role in Orgoglio, a period romance which ran for a few years in Italy with Martinelli participating in 2005. Rizzo predeceased her four years ago and she was living in Rome at the time of her death. What a wonderful woman she was.

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About elainelennon

An occasional movie-watching diary.

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