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El Dorado (1966)

El Dorado.jpg

Too mad to be scared and too sick to be worried about it.  Heartless tycoon Bart Jason (Edward Asner) hires a group of thugs to force the MacDonald family out of El Dorado so he can claim their land. J.P. Harrah (Robert Mitchum) the town’s sheriff, is too deep in the throes of alcoholism to help the family. When Harrah’s friend, noble elder gunfighter Cole Thorton (John Wayne), learns of the predicament, he travels to El Dorado with his upstart friend young gambler Mississippi (James Caan), to help Harrah clean up in time for a shootout against Jason’s men and hole up in the local jail with the assistance of an ageing Indian Bull Harris (Arthur Hunnicutt) and the regular attendance of local medic Miller (Paul Fix)You made better sense when you were drinking. People forget that part of producer/director Howard Hawks’ uniqueness in the American canon is just that – he was American. So his choice of subjects and his treatment of them is particular to him but also emblematic of the State of the Union itself. His re-union with screenwriter Leigh Brackett (and what a thrill it was to discover this gifted author was a woman!) adapting Harry Brown’s 1960 novel The Stars in Their Courses years after their first collaboration on The Big Sleep (they also did Rio Bravo and Hatari!) sees him at seemingly his most relaxed in a smoothly entertaining meditation on ageing, friendship, loyalty and good old-fashioned decency, detonating notions of heroism with ideas of fellowship and community. With all that, there are two shots worthy of a Hitchcock suspenser; a great showcase for both up and coming Caan and some mighty women (Michele Carey as ‘Joey’ MacDonald, Charlene Holt as the saloon owner Maudie whom both Thornton and Harrah love); and a demonstration that there is nothing like great star performances to make a good screenplay work. Wayne even plays a character named after his favourite Fordian hero and falls in a door during the climactic shootout, done for. Would that we had their like nowadays. Biker movie fans will enjoy seeing Adam Roarke as one of the MacDonald brothers. With a score by Nelson Riddle and wonderful title paintings by Olaf Wieghorst (who appears as Swede Larsen) this is so perfect you’ll believe you’ve downed a fine wine. You’re too good to give a chance to

About elainelennon

An occasional movie-watching diary.

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