Midnight Express (1978)

Midnight Express

The best thing to do is to get your ass out of here. Best way that you can. American college student Billy Hayes (Brad Davis) is caught smuggling hashish when he’s travelling out of Turkey with girlfriend Susan (Irene Miracle). He is prosecuted and jailed for four years. When his sentence is increased to 30 years, Billy, along with other inmates including British heroin addict Max (John Hurt) and American candle thief Jimmy (Randy Quaid), makes a plan to escape but local prisoners betray their plans to vicious guard Hamidou (Paul L. Smith)… It’s not a train. It’s a prison word for… escape. But it doesn’t stop around here. Adapted by Oliver Stone from Billy Hayes’ memoir (written with William Hoffer), this is a high wire act of male melodrama and violence with an astonishing, poundingly graphic series of setpieces that will definitely curdle your view of Turkey, even knowing that much of this was deliberately fabricated for effect. The searing heat, the horrendous conditions and the appalling locals will give pause to even the most strident anti-drugs campaigner. Director Alan Parker has a muscular, energetic style and brilliantly choreographs scenes big and small with the tragic and brilliant Davis (an appealing latterday James Dean-type performer) perfectly cast and Hurt a marvel as the shortsighted druggie whom he protects. The big scene where Davis totally loses it shocks to this day. Shot in Malta (permission to shoot in Istanbul was not granted, unsurprisingly) by Michael Seresin with a throbbing electronic score by Giorgio Moroder. Everyone runs around stabbing everyone else in the ass. That’s what they call Turkish revenge. I know it must all sound crazy to you, but this place is crazy

Melody (1971)

Melody 1971.png

Aka S.W.A.L.K. I’ve loved you a whole week already, haven’t I? Pre-teens Melody Perkins (Tracy Hyde) and Daniel Latimer (Mark Lester) are from very different backgrounds but are completely sincere in their desire to wed one another. Unfortunately, this leads to mockery by their classmates at their south London primary school. Nobody seems to understand their bond. First of all, Melody is embarrassed by the strength of this middle class boy’s feelings, then she succumbs and they bunk off one day to go to the beach. Their parents and teachers find the marriage proposal ridiculous, and Daniel’s closest mate Ornshaw (Jack Wild), doesn’t want to lose his best friend to a girl. But mischievous Ornshaw eventually warms to the idea, and helps Daniel and Melody escape the cruel  adults... It’s not bloody Cape Kennedy, it’s only an Ovaltine tin with a bit of weedkilller! A totally disarming, charming and perceptive account of life and puppy love from kids’ perspective shot with documentary-style realism (by DoP Peter Suchitzky) in an utterly recognisable London, mainly around Lambeth. People really do say, I’m going up West. The differences in class are clearly signalled but never so well as when two contrasting dinners are crosscut – at Daniel’s the grown up are jovially discussing religion while at Melody’s the women are sitting with plates on their laps watching a movie on the gogglebox. The kids are just so subtle, giving utterly believable performances: reunited from Oliver!  Lester and Wild are established stars from that production but Hyde is just as earnestly compelling as the girl. How she comes to replace Ornshaw as Daniel’s best friend is beautifully described. All the kindness, purity of feeling and poignancy is caught not just by writer Alan Parker but also by the brilliant Bee Gees and Crosby, Stills & Nash soundtrack. This is also great fun, adhering to Chekhov’s admonition that if there’s a gun in the first act, it must go off in the third – only these boys are building bombs! Directed by Waris Hussein. Fantastic. We’ll have the last laugh on this lot!