The Lady from Shanghai (1947)

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Personally I prefer a girlfriend not to have a husband. An Irish-American seaman Michael O’Hara (Orson Welles) becomes involved in a complex murder plot when he is hired by renowned criminal lawyer Arthur Bannister (Everett Sloan) to work on a yacht after rescuing the man’s wife Elsa (Rita Hayworth) from a disturbing attack in Central Park NYC. He soon finds himself implicated in the murder, despite his innocence. The film is best remembered for the climactic hall of mirrors scene with a shoot out amidst shards of shattering glass…. Orson Welles’ adaptation (with uncredited help from William Castle, Charles Lederer and Fletcher Markle) of a novel by Sherwood King was so confusing that Columbia boss Harry Cohn offered a reward to anyone who could make head or tail of it. Somebody please tell me what it’s about! But the plot of this murder mystery pastiche is hardly the point:  it’s a gorgeously shot tongue in cheek meditation on the games men and women play. Sometimes they wind up in murder. The narration is crucial. The hall of mirrors scene is justly famous. Shot by Charles Lawton (and Rudolph Maté and Joseph Walker) with the yachting scenes done on Errol Flynn’s Zaca, this is the one where Hayworth’s fiery locks were shorn into a shockingly short blonde bob and Welles sports a cod Oirish accent presumably culled from his days at Dublin’s Gate Theatre. Mad, strange and blacker than black, this is all about shadows and deception and imagery and set-pieces. Stunningly edited by Viola Lawrence. I never make my mind up about anything until it’s over and done with.

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Closer (2004)

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Patrick Marber is a hell of a writer. I loved his play Dealer’s Choice so when I heard his next play Closer was opening in London I grabbed a flight:  I just couldn’t wait. And it was – is – superb. Evidently I wasn’t the only fan because Mike Nichols directed this adaptation a half dozen or so years later. This is a modern and classic story of the roundelay of relationships:  NYC stripper Alice (Natalie Portman) is literally knocked sideways when she meets obituarist Dan (Jude Law) on a London street. A year later he’s written a book about her and flirts with the American photographer Anna (Julia Roberts)hired to do the jacket. It’s another coup de foudre. He messes in an online chatroom and unwittingly introduces Anna to dermatologist Larry (Clive Owen, who played Dan on the stage) whom she marries. A year after her exhibition (titled Strangers) opens, all their tangled relationships fall asunder as infidelity after infidelity is revealed… A play on Cosi fan tutte (with a cunningly integrated score by Suzana Peric), this is a stunningly intelligent treatment about love and sex:  and it messes with your head because it treats of the subject as it really is. Identity. Roleplay. Images. Pretending to be the person the other person thinks they want. (Unutterably exhausting, as Gone Girl informed us).  The closing reveal is a right shocker to people not paying attention. Alice is at the centre of everything:  that is clear when you rewind it mentally. The soundtrack is distinguished by Damien Rice’s extraordinary song The Blower’s Daughter. London looks great thanks to Stephen Goldblatt, it’s edited superbly and all the performances are excellent. I wish Marber would write more.