Wild Things (1998)

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Teenage sexpot Kelly Van Ryan (Denise Richards) is hot for teacher Sam (Matt Dillon), a former lover of her wealthy widowed mother Sandra (Theresa Russell) but he’s not having any. Well, not with her. So she cries Rape and he gets caught up in a very dense web involving loser Suzie (Neve Campbell) who also calls Rape. She was busted for drugs the previous year by Detective Duquette (Kevin Bacon) and suffered 6 months in the clink. When personal injury shyster lawyer Ken (Bill Murray) defends Sam the plot gets as convoluted and murky as a Florida swamp.  The girls admit they made it up because Sam didn’t protect Suzie from prison. Sam celebrates his eventual defamation winnings – by having sex with both girls. They were scamming Sandra for money. And that’s just the start of it. Cross, double cross, murder and betrayal are at the centre of a complex story that opens out like a neverending Russian nesting doll. Twisty Twister McTwisted isn’t in it! Sexy, funny, outrageous and brilliant neo noir. Written by Stephen Peters and directed by John (Henry:  Portrait of a Serial Killer) McNaughton, with a notable score by George Clinton. Super steamy.

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Wonder Woman (2017)

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Diana (Gal Gadot) is the stroppy kid brought up in an Amazonian matriarchy by mom Connie Nielsen and tough as hell trainer aunt Robin Wright. She cannot be told of her godlike origins in this society of strong women. Then WW1 crashes into their ancient Greek Island world in the form of airman Chris Pine, a double agent for the allies, kitted out in German uniform with their army hot on his tail as Diana drags him out of his plane. There’s fighting on the beach of a kind you don’t often see – bows and arrows against German gunfire. And when her aunt dies saving her, it’s up to Wonder Woman to take serious action against the god Aries whom she deems responsible for the global conflict. She heads to London with her newfound companion, there’s some very amusing and sexy byplay, a departure to the Front with an unpromising crew, some displays of camaraderie and great costume changes, excellent combat and truly evil Germans. And Aries is not who you think he is after all…. After years of snarky annoying movies about silly superheroes all shot in greyscale this is actually a colourful and proper good-versus-evil plot about gods and monsters that threatens but never actually tips into full camp (those first scenes gave me the wobbles but right prevailed), the humour is spot-on, the performances tonally perfect and I am pleased to agree with many others that this is really terrific. Well done director Patty (Monster) Jenkins and the screenwriter Allan Heinberg, working from a story by himself, Zack Snyder and Jason Fuchs. Miraculously it all seems to make sense. Based  – of course – on the comic book by William Moulton Marston. The soundtrack by Rupert Gregson-Williams is fabulous – but what I really wanted to hear was …. you know!!

LIFE (2015)

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Luke Davies’ screenplay centring on the circumstances behind the unforgettable LIFE photo essay about James Dean in an issue from March 1955 is uncertain about who the story’s protagonist is:   the most exciting actor most of us have ever seen, as incarnated by Dane DeHaan, or photographer Dennis Stock (Robert Pattinson)? Peculiarly it is Stock who comes across as pathological, unhappy and desperate whereas Dean seems a decent sort being screwed around by Jack Warner (Ben Kingsley) who knows he’s on to something great but wants to control this rebel from bad PR. Stock supposedly met Dean at a party at Nick Ray’s when he was casting Rebel Without a Cause and the distractions are looking at an actress who looks nothing like Natalie Wood and an epicene man who only bares a slight resemblance to Ray, along with the overriding story arc of Stock’s failed teenage marriage and his unwillingness to spend time with a very young son. Dean’s relationship with Pier Angeli is artfully used to construct the parameters of his Hollywood life;  while the trip the two men make back to Indiana before the premiere of East of Eden which commences in NYC’s Times Square is of course the setting for one of most people’s favourite poster, latterly called The Boulevard of Broken Dreams. The real story here is about the relationship between a photographer and his subject, whom he virtually stalked for the story, perhaps sensing something in Dean that Dean did not yet suspect was within himself. It’s nicely put together and shot, as you would expect from Anton Corbijn, a man who knows something about the craft behind creating iconic images – his rock career is probably the most notable of any photographer/video director of the last thirty years. But somehow even De Haan’s uncanny interpretation is not the favoured performance here and the ghastly Pattinson gets equal screen time in some sort of deluded payoff to the director’s former job. I don’t get it. How’d that happen?! There seems to be some kind of queer subtext that isn’t quite brought to the surface – despite the rumours about Dean, it’s Stock who appears to be unhealthily obsessive and projecting something that isn’t really there.  It makes you wonder about all those people who made money off their Jimmy stories when he was no longer around. Oh well, better to be talked about … than not. An opportunity mostly missed, sadly.

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Fathers and Daughters (2015)

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Russell Crowe’s the famous novelist who was driving the car in which his beloved wife died. His little girl and he survive but his injuries cause psychotic episodes so he goes away to get his mental status sorted out for a long 7 months and she’s parcelled out to his wife’s sister and her husband. Then when he returns they make his life miserable attempting to gain custody as revenge – because the women hated each other. The wealthy brother in law (Bruce Greenwood) provokes Crowe at every opportunity until he lets loose as his spasms contract his muscles and his temper flares … We’re in the present day and Amanda Seyfried is the screwed up daughter all grown up and practising paediatric psychological counselling during the day and screwing every man in sight at night until she meets her late dad’s biggest fan (Aaron Paul). The fallout from her past and her behaviour impacts on their romantic relationship in embarrassing fashion. So what’s wrong with this picture? Pretty much everything. It’s disconnected. It’s calculated to make you empathise but you don’t. It was one of those famous Hollywood Black List screenplays (by Brad Desch) that got picked up and made by an Italian director Gabriele Muccino and has an amazing cast that also includes Jane Fonda, Octavia Spencer, Diane Kruger and Janet McTeer and yet it doesn’t matter. At some level it’s dissociated from its own content and does not make a lot of sense despite the title being the name of the Pulitzer writer’s most famous novel. Weird.

The Awful Truth (1937)

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Leo McCarey was probably the best looking, classiest, coolest director in Hollywood in his time. When smoother-than-thou Cary Grant suffered a crisis of confidence shooting this comedy of remarriage and couldn’t switch roles with Ralph Bellamy he ended up imitating McCarey and inadvertently became the hero of the screwball genre and probably the greatest comic actor of all time – and that’s saying something. And this was the role that shaped his approach to most of his other performances. He and Irene Dunne are both playing around and agree to a divorce – but argue for custody of the fabulous Mr Smith the wire fox terrier played by Skippy aka Asta from The Thin Man series – and who wouldn’t? Bellamy is the hayseed oilman she takes up with, Molly Lamont is the wealthy playgirl Cary fools around with, but they can’t avoid their attraction to each other. This ends with a notorious tease and a black cat. Truly, Leo McCarey had the Lubitsch Touch – better even than Lubitsch himself. Art Deco screwball at its most sophisticated and witty. Adapted from Arthur Richman’s play by Vina Delmar with help from Sidney Buchman and McCarey himself. Sublime.

Jem and the Holograms (2015)

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Apparently this poptastic creation is an adaptation of an Eighties animation (can’t say I remember it) and was a labour of love for its writer/director Jon M. Chu but for an audience over the age of 12 it’s mostly a chore. The original premise was about the owner of Starlight Music who has a double life as a pop star by virtue of a hologram but technology has moved on. Starring TV’s Nashville songstress Aubrey Peeples as the orphaned girl Jerrica Benton whose spectacular singing voice brings her stardom via the internet (that vehicle for epic narcissism).  She is still in mourning for her father, who appears to her in a pre-recorded hologram and gives her strength, materialising from a little robot that bears a striking resemblance to Star Wars‘ BB-8. Peeples was probably cast not merely for the power of her pipes but for the very K-Stewness of her appearance: she even has one side of her head shaven to resemble her at one point (in one of the several wigs she’s made wear.) She and her sister Kimber have two foster sisters out of juvie and Molly Ringwald is her aunt Bailey (when her face is in repose she’s barely recognisable:  that’s how long it’s been since we’ve seen her). They all live in one happy multi-ethnic home  which is going to be repossessed in 30 days so that’s how long they have to become stars and make money. The skinny ruthless manager Erica Raymond who sees them online is played very well by Juliette Lewis as (presumably) a figure she might be familiar with in her own offscreen rock career and she does it very well as a sort of wicked stepmother to the Cinders girl who feels cornered when confronted with a solo contract and is rechristened Jem. Erica has a handsome son who fancies ‘Jem’, that enigmatic character who is, ultimately, what her audience decides she is …. A product of that well-known pop auteur, Scooter Braun, presumably on an off-day from managing someone he found online. I don’t remember a single song but I believe that’s probably not the point.