The Object of My Affection (1998)

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This adaptation of Stephen McCauley’s novel (by playwright Wendy Wasserstein) has impeccable theatrical credentials, as it is directed by Nicholas Hytner, but also has crossover appeal because of the crucial casting of TV star Jennifer Aniston and visiting Friends regular Paul Rudd. This romcom with a difference – because the titular object is a gay man – touches so many contemporary hot button topics: ¬†alternative families, LGBTQ lifestyles, single motherhood, class, social status – and does so with a light-ish style, in quite a long comic/dramatic narrative that allows for decent character exposition and actual conversations. Aniston is the social worker stepsister of Allison Janney, who’s married to a hot literary agent, Alan Alda. Their daughter attends a private school where the terrific young first grade teacher Paul Rudd runs a great musical production every year. He winds up at one of their dinner parties where fellow invitee Aniston unwittingly reveals to him that his gay lover Tim Daly wants him out of their apartment. So she rents him a room at her place … and falls for him while she’s pregnant with her laywer boyfriend’s baby. She thinks she and Rudd can raise her baby together. Trouble is, his ex wants him back, then he falls for a gay mentor’s own roommate, and the baby is on the way, while the lawyer (John Pankow) himself finds love elsewhere after being shut out for so long. A lot like life, with a good feeling for how people really are and the playing is superb with Nigel Hawthorne a particular joy as a wise old queen who gently asks Aniston at Thanksgiving Dinner what will happen when all her male homosexual friends disappear. For fag hags everywhere!

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Don’t Talk to Strange Men (1962)

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British cinema has thrown up some worthy B-movies and this is one of them, from the venerable Pat Jackson, who made his name in the documentary movement and whose first feature, Western Approaches, about the Battle of the Atlantic, remains his finest work. Gwen Cherrell’s screenplay tells the story of a flighty teenage girl Jean (Christina Gregg) who picks up the ringing telephone in a call box whilst waiting for the bus to her part-time job at the local pub run by her dad’s friend Ron (Conrad Phillips). She strikes up a friendship with the man on the line, adopts the moniker Samantha for their daily calls and convinced that this is Love, agrees to meet him. There’s been a spate of killings in the area and she pays no heed until Dad grounds her and her sensible younger sister Ann (Janina Faye) but they plan an outing to the cinema so that Jean¬† can meet this unseen beau. Bus conductress Molly (the fabulous Dandy Nichols) warns her not to go through with her airhead schemes but she pays no heed. Until she finds herself waiting for the real-life meeting and gets cold feet. But her little sister feels the fear and goes to her rescue … This is a surprisingly taut suspense thriller, much of it taking place in a telephone kiosk (remember them?!) and assisted immeasurably by good family dynamics (real-life spouses Cyril Raymond and Gillian Lind are the put-upon parents), bolshy Ann writing letters to politicians about bloodsports, the lowkey Home Counties setting (even the opening discovery of a young woman’s body in a barn), the rhythm established by the regular phonecalls, the bus journeys, the conversations, and a winning performance by Gregg, a model and actress better known for roles in TV’s Danger Man and The Saint. What’s interesting is of course how people do the utterly unexpected and act the opposite way that you’d expect – as in life, so in movies, and that’s what turns this into something unbearably tense. There are tropes here that would become a staple of slasher films in the Seventies. Faye has had a much longer career than her co-star and is probably better known for her big screen work in Dracula and The Day of the Triffids and has often appeared at Hammer conventions. She has also directed a short film called Green Fingers starring Ingrid Pitt. She previously appeared in the rather similarly-themed Never Take Sweets from a Stranger. Actress and screenwriter Cherrell would go on to write The Walking Stick (1970), Brief Encounter (1974) – the Burton/Loren version, and TV sitcom Leave it to Charlie (1978). Made at Marylebone Studios and on location in Bucks., and distributed by Bryanston.