The Passionate Friends (1949)

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In which David Lean commences his passionate affair with le cinema du tourisme. This adaptation of HG Wells’ novel of adultery (of which he knew a little) is full of fabulous awkwardness between banker hubby Claude Rains and perpetually cross wife Ann Todd, who relives her early affair with pre-WW2 lover research scientist Trevor Howard – who turns up unexpectedly in their destination Alpine hotel one fine day after the war, where she awaits her husband’s arrival. His unfounded suspicions drive the old lovers back together and social homicide awaits them all in London… Adapted by Eric Ambler, Stanley Haynes and Lean himself, who did like a bit of Freud, this is a fine exploration of marital issues, decency and class, with an exceptional score by Richard Addinsell underlining the wracking feelings bedevilling the lovers and the betrayed. Rains is brilliant, undercutting the relegation of this to ‘woman’s picture’ and entering into something closer to finely tuned emotion. His upstaging of Todd after a romantic evening she has covered up by a supposed theatre trip is outstandingly tense;  his speech about German romanticism a chilling reminder of the times in which it was made. Todd isn’t up to communicating anything of real value despite the flashbacks she narrates but Howard reminds us of Brief Encounter and all those things that remain unsaid. The ending is quite shocking in many respects and brings it close to those Russian classics we love and admire but don’t really want to experience.

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White Cradle Inn (1947)

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Aka High Fury. This is one of the more unusual post-WW2 films, about a couple whose marriage unravels when mountain innkeeper Madeleine Carroll wants to adopt Roger (Michael McKeag) the orphaned French boy who was billeted with them throughout the war, and adulterous husband Michael Rennie objects. Ian Hunter is the doctor who tries to broker a truce. This being a mountain film, nature has the final say. There are some marvellous scenic sequences and the climbing shots are well achieved despite the obvious budgetary limitations. The poised Carroll was of course best known for her appearance for Hitchcock in The 39 Steps and despite the Swiss setting she is noticeably less blonde here. Her performance is well modulated and Rennie does well in an essentially unsympathetic role. This is fairly slow moving but the dramatic ending is worth it. Written by Basil Mason and Lesley Storm:  Storm would become the better known of the screenwriting duo, with credits for The Heart of the Matter and The Spanish Gardener.  Directed by Harold French. Alpine madness ahoy.

Where Eagles Dare (1968)

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If you don’t like this, there’s a high probability that you’re either dead or German (preferably both) and you definitely hate Top Gear. So stop reading now. This, like The Great Escape and The Guns of Navarone, is the only litmus test for a common humanity amongst right-thinking viewers. The story of Allied agents trying to break into a castle (Schloss Adler) held by the Nazis to break out a British colonel, it has Eastwood and Burton and Mary Ure working their way into the fortress to stop losing headway on the planned D-Day landings.  Or … something else???? Twisty Twister McTwisted! Fabulous stunts, great scenery, terrifying cable-car scenes, amazing tension, wonderful action. Just what you want, really, from a film. Another reminder that the prolific Alistair MacLean wrote brilliant books. Happy New Year.