Love of My Life (2017)

 

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– Princess. Dictator. Eva Peron. Three of the stars of Four Weddings and a Funeral are reunited for a film by writer/director Joan Carr-Wiggin.  Grace (Anna Chancellor) has been diagnosed with a brain tumour and her husband James Fleet is the one falling apart. Her ex-husband John Hannah shows up to seduce her one last time, convinced he was The One. He made money off their marriage after cheating on her with Hermione Norris and commemorating her in a prize-winning bestseller. Her daughters from both her marriages show up and pretend they’re living their best lives while she carries on going to work in an architecture practice – her dream job, but she’s still unfulfilled because she never created a beautiful building. And she has five days before surgery to read Middlemarch and there’s that promise of an affair with Greg Wise at the office … This is a great premise that paced better could have been an hysterical screwball comedy – or a French farce. In fact for the first twenty minutes I was utterly baffled by the array of American and English accents since I thought it was set in London. Turns out it’s set in Toronto – but half the cast are relocated Brits. If you don’t even know where a film is located there’s a problem with the writing. When Norris – Hannah’s current wife for whom he squandered his marriage – turns up from London to join the deathwatch the dialogue improves but she loses half the words in her neck, including the above quote. A lot of this could literally have worked by speeding things up – a better director might have mined the humour, shot it more interestingly despite the low budget and properly explored the subject matter with a little less sympathy and more gallows. Like I said, imagine it in French and its implausibility actually becomes far more workable.  And for a film about a wannabe architect the setting and dressing are terrible. Weird!

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Beat Girl (1959)

Beat Girl poster

One of those legendary Brit cult films that seem like such a curate’s egg at this distance. Divorced architect David Farrar brings a French poodle (Noelle Adam) home to his sulky beatnik teenage daughter Jennifer (Gillian Hills) and she discovers Maman was a stripper and a whore. She spends her time with other privileged kids like Peter McEnery and Shirley Anne Field and they groove to Adam Faith’s music at the Offbeat Cafe before taking off in a chicken run just for kicks. The strip club near the Offbeat run by Christopher Lee is the key to Maman’s past and Jennifer gets a taste for it after finding out from him that her colleague Greta (Delphi Lawrence) shared more than just a background in dance class in Paris. This is part-melodrama, part-shocker, with one extraordinarily lewd strip scene featuring the talents of ‘Pascaline’. Adam Faith’s musical partnership with John Barry finally bore fruit for him after this and he scored some chart hits (his speech impediment is what’s striking here); while this was Barry’s first film score and the first British soundtrack album ever released. Lawrence doesn’t feature in the credits despite being central to the plot;  Oliver Reed – whose uncle Carol got him the role – is in the ensemble as ‘Plaid Shirt’;  if you look fast you’ll spot Carol White in the Offbeat. The story and screenplay were by Dail Ambler, while direction was by Anglo-French Jew Edmond Greville, whose career came to a halt under the Nazi Occupation. Gillian Hills had already been in Vadim’s Dangerous Liaisons 1960, which, as far as snowy Alpine adultery dramas go, is top of the list. She later became famous as a ‘ye ye’ singer in France and she’ll always have a place in my heart for playing Alison in the TV version of The Owl Service as well as starring as Elizabeth in Demons of the Mind, written by my late friend, Christopher Wicking. She had several other acting roles but later turned to illustration and married the manager of AC/DC. Tres cool, daddy-o!