Lure of the Wilderness (1952)

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I was in here six years afore I found my way out. In the early 1900s, Zack Tyler (Tom Tully) and his son Ben (Jeffrey Hunter) are fur trappers living near Georgia’s Okefenokee Swamp. In the course of searching for their dog in the swamp they discover Jim Harper (Walter Brennan), a fugitive who has been unjustly accused of a killing, and his daughter, Laurie (Jean Peters), who has developed very few social skills due to her 8 years spent living in the wild. Zack becomes convinced of Jim’s innocence and attempts to set up a proper criminal defence, while Ben and Laurie begin to fall in love. But Dave Longden (Jack Elam) smells a rat and starts to think like the lynch mob that drove out the Harpers all those years ago…  What did we ever do to you ones on the outside to get this?Adapted by Louis Lantz from Vereen Bell’s 1941 novel Swamp Water (previously adapted by Jean Renoir and also starring Brennan, Walter Huston, Dana Andrews and Anne Baxter), this is a colourful, lyrical action-adventure tale, getting the full-blooded Twentieth Century-Fox treatment including an OTT score by Franz Waxman. Director Jean Negulesco always had an eye for the worthy visual (even if the Technicolor might mute the Southern Gothic sensibility) but he was not noted for his interaction with performers.  However Brennan is always worth watching and hearing him perform a song and witnessing him wrestle a ‘gator is worth the price of admission. Irish actress Constance Smith has a small but meaty role as Zack’s feisty jilted girlfriend and the fight she inspires between Hunter and her new beau helps the film attain the kind of liveliness this material demands. The midpoint sequence is the best – the murk of the swamp comes to wild life as Hunter and the darkly enchanting Peters get to know each other a little better. Just like coming back to life

 

Man in the Attic (1953)

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Ugly does as ugly is:  there’s a lesson here, folks, Beware ugly people and that means Jack Palance, an actor rather limited by his foreboding appearance. What he lacked in looks he made up in horrible intensity.  In this B-movie adaptation of Marie Belloc Lowndes’ fictionalised Ripper tale, The Lodger (already done by Hitchcock and John Brahm) he’s the self-proclaimed pathologist renting a room in London c1888 from Helen Harley (Frances Bavier),  whose niece, dance hall performer Lily Bonner (Constance Smith) responds to him and ignores warnings about his odd behaviour while all around her London looks for Jack. Hugo Fregonese directs an oft-told tale with surprising dexterity, the theatrical shows are well staged, it’s commandingly shot by Leo Tover, Palance goes off the rails as only he can and it’s great to see Smith, Ireland’s answer to Hedy Lamarr, giving her considerable all as the decent, naive Parisian veteran – surely a contradiction in terms. Adapted by Barré Lyndon and Robert Presnell Jr, edited by the marvellous Marjorie Fowler.