Finding Nemo (2003)

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Sure we could jaw about the recuperative power of the paternal and how it became a thing in US movies after 9/11 but we’ve done that, kinda, and we could jar about how irritating animations are since the Noughties cos they’re always about parents trying to be heroes to their kids (yawn) … but there’s a reason this was Prince’s favourite film. Mom is dispensed with in a horrible tragedy opening our story. Then Little Nemo with his underdeveloped fin swims too close to a boat despite his pop Marlin the Clownfish’s warnings. He gets stuck in a dentist’s aquarium with the threat of an awful ginger child coming to take him away. Meanwhile pop teams up with the irritating if affectionate bluefish Dory – complete with goldfish memory – and literally goes through hell and high water to rescue his son. Nemo finds his fins in captivity and there’s one great reunion. It’s exciting, tense, witty, adventurous, full of danger. Maybe I wouldn’t love this as much if I hadn’t witnessed an act of heroism in my own fishtank one day when Basil swooped down to take a huge food flake out of Hector’s little mouth (and promptly ate it himself). He saved his life. And this enchantment under the sea might save yours. Just keep swimming.

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Come Dance With Me! (1959)

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It’s always good to see Brigitte Bardot, even in a lesser crime drama. She’s the young wife of the dentist (Henri Vidal) who has a one-night stand (with Dawn Addams) that is photographed in a bid to blackmail him. She follows him to the dance studio where the tryst took place and finds him with his lover’s corpse and a gun in his hand – then goes undercover as a teacher to root out the real culprit… Adieu, trystesse! Interesting for an excursion to a drag club, a gay villain and the performance of Serge Gainsbourg as Addams’ lover and it’s the final film of Vidal who died immediately after shooting. The dialogue is a little on the nose for what is essentially a comic mystery. But the more BB finds out, the more revealing her costumes become and she dances up a storm, as you’d expect from a trained ballerina. Gainsbourg sings the title song in a film which made less than BB’s previous hits yet she earned more than she ever had before in terms of salary, leading her producer, Raoul Levy, to sever their collaboration, claiming she was finished. Incroyable!