A Welcome to Britain (1943)

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Burgess Meredith introduces American troops to the scepter’d isle to prepare them for the bizarre rituals of the locals: this Defense Dept film was intended to smooth relations between the beleaguered Brits and the crass Yankee soldiers – with one million of them swirling around the old country up to December 1943 throwing their money around and behaving inappropriately. In an amusing series of vignettes co-directed by Anthony Asquith and star Meredith, we learn how to behave in pubs (not the same as saloons), the family home, restaurants (where there’s a variation on potato for every war-rationed course); discover the geography of the country with Felix Aylmer as ‘Mister Chips’ in a classroom; Bob Hope explains shillings and pence and Beatrice Lillie performs one of her bits. All in all fairly palatable, with the glaring example of introducing the notion of coloured soldiers which yields an exchange with a General best deemed of its time. There is some gunfire and a little action with real-life soldiers but this propaganda docu-drama is notable for having been telecast Stateside in 1944.

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Man On Wire (2008)

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James Marsh’s adaptation of high-wire walker Philippe Petit’s book To Reach the Clouds is weirdly thrilling:  the story of his dance across the clouds between the World Trade Center towers in 1974. Featuring interviews with the key players, dramatic reconstructions, home movie footage, old interviews and stills of the act itself, this is a monument to daring, devilry, the NYPD’s legal praxis  (Petit & Co were arrested, one deported) and an architectural wonder which was destroyed in 9/11 and is the horribly tragic elephant in the room. It all goes to show that people do incredible things.

San Demetrio London (1943)

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“I’ll do my best to steer her in the right direction but it’ll be by a guess and by God.” So says the captain of a downed merchant tanker which the crew reclaims from their lifeboat after U-boats have torpedoed it and they find it floating and on fire in the Atlantic. There are no star performances here – it’s not In Which We Serve either, a dissection of class – just a group of ordinary men, including a Yank, coming to the aid of this entity afloat. It of course serves as a metaphor for little island Britain and pluck and Allied cooperation. Robert Hamer came to the rescue of Charles Frend when he became very ill during production and they both wrote the screenplay. One of a number of propaganda films made by Ealing Studios and it makes excellent use of stock footage.