Sullivan’s Travels (1941)

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There’s a lot to be said for making people laugh. Did you know that that’s all some people have? It isn’t much, but it’s better than nothing in this cockeyed caravan. John L. Sullivan (Joel McCrea) is the creme de la creme of Hollywood directors, maker of such fine escapist fare as Ants in Your Pants of 1939. The audiences love him! But he wants to make a social contribution and desires more than anything critical favour and socially relevant material. His butler (Robert Greig) and valet (Eric Blore – how I love him!) deplore the idea. He is followed by a fully-staffed double-decker bus provided by studio boss Lebrand (Robert Warwick) should his needs demand anything solid like a bed or food. He fails first time out but second time he determines to dress up like a hobo and find out what real life is like for the working man. He encounters a waitress known only as The Girl (Veronica Lake) who takes pity on him and he ultimately realises – after serious trials – that making ordinary joes laugh and relieving their impoverished misery is far better than any serious-minded nonsense like his planned adaptation of that crack preachy serious novel, O, Brother Where Art Thou?  McCrea is superb and Lake is stunning as the super-sweet girl who falls for this man who’s supposedly hit hard times. As if! Was there ever a finer Hollywood satire? Hardly. From the camera-stylo de Preston Sturges whose favourite players are all over the cast. He’s the only filmmaker whose office I tried to locate on the Paramount Studios tour. Oh! The hilarity! Sheer, unadulterated genius.

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Christmas in Connecticut (1945)

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Probably my favourite seasonal movie and definitely on the player the night before Christmas and the month leading up to it… Barbara Stanwyck is the homemaking expert whose New England farm and family are a fiction – which proves a problem when her publisher invites a war hero to spend the holiday with her. She has to move out of her coldwater city flat to save her job and make nice with all sorts. High merriment ensues in the company of Dennis Morgan, S.Z. Sakall, Reginald Gardiner, Una O’Connor and Sydney Greenstreet (and, for his diehard fans, Eric Blore makes an uncredited appearance as Greenstreet’s butler!) Properly packed full of snow, Christmas cheer, emotion, hilarity and sentiment. Simply wonderful classic entertainment.