Overboard (1987)

Overboard movie poster.jpg

I have never willingly foregone an opportunity to watch a Goldie Hawn movie:  she’s my kind of girl. And Leslie Dixon is a damned fine screenwriter – this was her sophomore outing – and as for Garry Marshall… well we know all about how well he could commandeer a comedy and make it as charming as you like. This is the screwball one on the boat where Goldie’s the rich bitch travelling up the Pacific coast with hubby Edward Herrmann being roundly abusive to all the staff and particularly carpenter Kurt Russell whom she hires to remodel her closet. When she’s picked up by a garbage scow after a late-night fall, Herrmann affects not to know her and Russell pretends she’s his wife and the mother of his four near-feral sons and makes hay out of her amnesia. She just knows she wasn’t meant for life in a hovel but weirdly becomes attached to the kids even after they’ve Superglued her hands to serving plates. Then her mother guilt trips her hubby out of partying with his girl pals and he goes looking for her … This works as a pastiche of 1930s screwball comedy and populist fable but more than that it capitalises on the charisma of the cast which includes Roddy McDowall who executive produced. It’s beautifully photographed by the venerable John A. Alonzo and boasts a song by Randy Newman and while it’s not a classic Goldie is always worth a whirl – not to mention she’s paired with real life love Kurt – and it’s now attained cult status. Go on. You know you’ll love it.

Foul Play (1978)

Foul Play poster.jpg

Beware the dwarf! I just love Goldie Hawn. And I love pretty much every single thing she’s ever done: now how many actors or actresses can you say that about? Seeing her puts a smile on my face. And this Hitchcockian farce from the pen of Colin Higgins is screamingly funny. She’s quiet divorced librarian Gloria Mundy who picks up Scotty (Bruce Solomon), a hitchhiker with a roll of film concealed in his cigarette packet, and gets embroiled in a plot to assassinate the Pope in San Francisco. There’s an albino killer, a dangerous dwarf, a snake owned by resourceful neighbour Mr Hennessy (Burgess Meredith), a sexy cop Tony Carlson (Chevy Chase) and a most unseemly setup at the Catholic bishopric with the Archbishop (Eugene Roche) and Miss Casswell (Rachel Roberts). There’s a brilliant sidebar relationship with sex addict Stanley (Dudley Moore), regular interludes with a fellow librarian Stella (Marilyn Sokol) who’s convinced every man is after her for sex; and all the while Goldie is trying not to get killed for something she knows nothing about. It’s laugh-a-minute hilarity from the get-go with Barry Manilow’s songs to soothe the fevered brow as the antics proceed at breathtaking pace performed with gusto by a wonderful cast. A must-see.

Private Benjamin (1980)

Private Benjamin poster.jpg

What a delight this is – a movie about a woman who finally finds herself – without a man, or a clue. So she ENLISTS??? This starts hilariously and even lewdly when Judy Benjamin’s second hubby dies in flagrante and she holes up in a motel eating pizza. The US Army comes calling at a weak moment. It’s not the Club Med experience after all. But in Europe she gains a real sense of self … and is diverted by a Frenchman who lures her away and subjects her to the kind of makeover Goldie Hawn sends up in Death Becomes Her. This mix of comedy, rites of passage, marriage and forces satire was huge and gave the fabulous Ms Hawn a sense of control over her career (she produced) which however dissipated fairly quickly. But it was Nancy Meyers’ first screenplay – and she went (eventually) from strength to strength. I write about it in my book about Meyers on sale at Amazon (shameless plug). Pathways of Desire:  Emotional Architecture in the Films of Nancy Meyers is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01BYFC4QW

The Sugarland Express (1974)

Sugarland Express poster 2

Goldie Hawn hasn’t made a film in over a decade. She is renowned as a beautiful, quirky, skillful comedienne yet probably her greatest performance came in Steven Spielberg’s first theatrical feature. Let nobody say that his first political films came in the 80s, here he was making quite the statement about rednecks, child protection, prison and gun law. The sly pre-release escape of Lou Jean and her husband (William Atherton) plays against precisely this southern backdrop as she determines to rescue their toddler son from his state-appointed foster family and they end up taking a hapless policeman hostage. The pursuit is statewide and the public line the roads to show their support for the dementedly funny couple. Spielberg was working from a screenplay by Hal Barwood and Matthew Robbins with a story he helped devise from a real incident a few years earlier.  Aside from the technical beauty of the film and some real photographic innovations by Vilmos Zsigmond, this film is distinguished by Hawn’s brilliance. She turned 70 a few days ago. How is that possible?  Happy birthday, Goldie.