Interlude (1968)

Interlude 1968.jpeg

What you are doesn’t need me. You don’t need anything.  Some years after their affair Stefan and Sally run into each other:  married Stefan Zelter (Oskar Werner) is a symphony conductor based in England who grants an interview to Sally (Barbara Ferris), a beautiful young reporter from The Evening Standard. While they talk, he makes a candid remark that gets him into trouble in both his personal and his professional life. To get away from the situation, Stefan, who is married to Antonia (Virginia Maskell), is advised by his lawyer to take a break which is when he meets Sally again and the two begin a romance. Her colleague Natalie (Geraldine Sherman), who is also having an affair with a married man, warns her about how these things go – never ever make a phonecall, even though you live by the phone waiting for him – and, even as it intensifies, he still hasn’t left his wife and family and she wants to quit him but can’t quite manage …  Touching romance, a remake of the Douglas Sirk film from a decade earlier, and scripted by Lee Langley and Hugh Leonard, this marks the directing debut of Kevin Billington.  Werner is perfect as the arrogant and passionate conductor with Maskell ideal casting as his wife who can tolerate a lot but not a love affair although she makes a good stab at it. The dinner she proposes between the threesome in this triangle is excruciating to the point she cannot bear it herself. Ferris is an unusual actress and her performance is both straight and sympathetic – honest, I think is the word. There are nice supporting performances from John Cleese as a TV PR who believes satire is his best talent (!) and Donald Sutherland as Stefan’s divorced friend who tells Antonia he wouldn’t spill the beans if he knew Stefan were having an affair. Stefan ironically observes his father-in-law dining with his own mistress which precipitates a hasty exit from a restaurant. When Sally breaks the rules by phoning Stefan prior to a performance we know this will end the way it must. Well told tale, with a stunning soundtrack, especially the original score by the great Georges Delerue.