Pete’s Dragon (2016)

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Bryce Dallas Howard ran around Jurassic World in high heels so donning the garb of forest ranger Grace should come pretty easy, dontcha think? Her stepdaughter Natalie (Oona Laurence) finds little Pete (Oakes Fegley) deep in the woods her uncle Gavin (Karl Urban) is busy upending. Pete’s folks died in a car crash 6 years earlier and he’s been living there with his best friend Elliott. Who happens to be a dragon, the kind that Grace’s dad (Robert Redford) has been telling her about for years, since her mother died when she was five. Grace’s boyfriend (Wes Bentley, welcome back) reads Pete the storybook that is his only remaining possession and Natalie has a copy – his own is the giveaway to Elliott’s cave, which Gavin quickly exploits … I don’t know about you but the last time I cried at a movie was … The Passion of Joan of Arc. And  Running On Empty. And ET, of course. (More than once but decades apart.) Amazingly, this out-Spielbergs Spielberg in Disney’s own remake of its 1977 musical which I have never been able to get through, despite – or maybe because of – Helen Reddy. This is straight drama and the casting is spot-on, the tone is perfectly managed and the overall effect is funny, smart, touching, witty, scary and magical. Absolutely wonderful. Now how often can you say that? And during the worst summer in living movie memory. There is a message of course – about conservation, family, decency, hunting … You can figure that out yourself. Get your tissues ready. Written and directed by David Lowery, with Tony Halbrooks also credited for writing, based on the original screenplay by Malcolm Marmorstein.

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Alice Through the Looking Glass (2016)

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I disliked the Tim Burton evocation of Alice in Wonderland so much I almost barfed;  this one, I guess I acclimatised to the concept after all these years, despite misgivings. Even if this doesn’t conform much to the story or the vision of Carroll, perhaps the autumnal hues don’t grate as much as the earlier film. Mia’s back with great big hair, Sacha Baron Cohen does a Werner Herzog impression as Time,we have an explanation for Helena Bonham Carter’s oversized head and Mr Depp lithps hith way through his Hatterisms. Actually, it’s quite good!

Abbott and Costello Meet the Invisible Man (1951)

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The only time my parents expressed any concern about my childhood viewing habits was when they found me watching comedy double act Abbott and Costello – because Bud Abbott was such a bully. This reminds me of those halcyon summer mornings before tearing off to play with my friends then whiling away afternoons at the tennis club before a night of Christopher Lee acting all Fu Manchu. Sigh! Here, no sooner have our bumbling duo graduated from private detective school than a boxer on the run from the cops requires their services. He’s alleged to have killed his manager. His girlfriend’s father injects him with invisibility serum to help him find the gangster who framed him and all hell breaks loose when everyone thinks Costello is a great boxer. A classic match ensues. The special effects by Stanley Horsley are fantastic, the jokes funny (I especially like the one about a Whole Nelson) and it’s fast and furious. If you don’t like it, chances are you had better check your pulse.