Happy 80th Birthday John Cleese 27th October 2019!

And now for something completely different. The multi-talented man born John Cheese celebrates 80 years on the planet today. Fresh from Cambridge Footlights he started to work with the greatest generation of comics Britain has produced, and soon became a household name on BBC TV writing and performing sketches, later gaining infamy with Monty Python’s Flying Circus and then becoming legend with Fawlty Towers. With the Python crew he made hilarious and occasionally controversial big-screen comedies and then wrote and (co-)directed himself in A Fish Called Wanda. He’s a regular in Hollywood productions – doing comic bits, TV appearances, voicing animated characters, becoming part of the James Bond and Harry Potter franchises – and reunited with the Pythons on stage to pay his latest alimony bills. Absurdly talented, extremely funny and very, very tall, it’s time to pay homage to a genius of British comedy. Happy birthday John Cleese!

Clockwise (1986)

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The first step to knowing who you are is knowing where you are and when you are. Comprehensive school headmaster Brian Stimpson (John Cleese) is obsessed with timeliness, order and discipline. He tends to add the word ‘Right’ to everything he says, which inadvertently gives people misdirections and wrong impressions.  After meticulously preparing a speech for a Headmasters’ conference, Brian misses his train. With no one else to turn to, he asks student Laura Wisely (Sharon Maiden) for a lift to Norwich. Laura, upset over a break-up with what turns out to be a married colleague of Brian’s, impulsively agrees to drive him in her parents’ car – which alarms her mother (Pat Keen) and father (Geoffrey Hutchings), who worry that she has run away with a married man so they alert the police. Brian and Laura forget to pay for petrol; crash into a squad car; run into an old college friend of Brian’s (Penelope Wilton) who gets the impression that Brian is having an affair with this schoolgirl; get stuck in the mud; and then find themselves in a monastery – all the while unaware that a growing number of people are chasing them who wind up at the conference long before Brian ever manages to get there … We can’t go forwards so we’ll go backwards instead. Novelist and playwright Michael Frayn wrote this on spec as an experiment in screenwriting and John Cleese agreed to it the moment his agent sent it to him. In his tour de force performance of a man gradually unravelling as his scheme is destroyed by one simple mistake, you can see that it’s a perfect fit for the man who made Basil Fawlty part of the lexicon. Mild-mannered English comedy it may be but at times it’s supremely funny and as well constructed as, well, a clock. Superb support from Alison Steadman as his disbelieving wife, Maiden as the worldly sixth-former eager to use her study period on an away day to make her lover jealous, and a cast of more or less familiar faces, all winding Brian up even while he tries to re-run that all-important speech in his head. Highly amusing. Directed by Christopher Morahan. It’s not the despair. I can stand the despair. It’s the hope