Viva Las Vegas (1964)

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Aka Love in Las Vegas. The legendary pairing of The King with Ann-Margret is literally the whole show in a town full of them. Even for an Elvis film the storyline is surprisingly weak but the eye-poppingly colourful scene-setting by supreme stylist George Sidney mitigates the problem. Elvis  is Lucky Jackson, a talented singer and driver whose luck has run out so he’s in Vegas to raise money to take part in the Grand Prix. He sees dancer and swimming instructor Rusty (A-M) and is smitten. But so is his rival, Count Elmo Mancini (Cesare Danova). Lucky and Rusty do some sightseeing around the Hoover Dam – nice helicopter views – and we learn a little about Nevada and her good relationship with her father (William Demarest).  Lucky winds up losing all his money in the hotel pool and having to earn his living as a waiter which leads to some nice slapstick serving Rusty and Elmo. Then his luck turns and there is the climactic race across the desert which is pretty well shot and there are some disasters along the route … The songs are terrific and the sequences of the city and casinos are wonderful. You can see Teri Garr in a bit part as a showgirl at one point but the most surprising element is that this was written by Sally Benson, responsible for Meet Me in St Louis. And then there’s the real-life romance between Elvis and Ann-Margret! In the film they marry at the Little Church of the West, the oldest wedding chapel in Vegas.

The Goob (2014)

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Guy Myhill’s Fenland drama is brutal stuff. It’s a long hot summer for Goob (Liam Walpole) who arrives home to find Mum (Sienna Guillory) shacked up at a transport cafe with ugly violent stock racing bully Gene (Sean Harris) and he has to grow up bloody fast. A gay cousin who likes to dance and cross-dress and a lovely foreign fruit picker create diversions and ultimately obstructions and Goob has to choose sides in a dangerous household that has already seen off his brother following a prank gone wrong. This is an intelligent story of violent sordid lowlifes with limited ambitions and worldviews and while convincingly and even poetically evoked at times it’s a tough watch. Guillory’s willing subjugation is hard to take while son Goob is the collateral damage. Harris, one of the least attractive individuals ever to grace a screen, is all too realistic; and the masturbation and sex scenes are somewhat de trop, as Celeste Holm might have said. Sometimes some things are best left … imagined. Spare and affecting with some really good faces inhabiting a fascinating landscape, beautifully captured in shimmering golden hour light, a new approach to British social realism.

Crash and Burn (2016)

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Irishman Tommy Byrne is a legend in the motor racing world – the extravagantly talented driver who screwed around, screwed up and threw it all away, is how the story goes. He raced in F3, pissed off a lot of people like Van Diemen teammate Ayrton Senna, himself the subject of an even more ultimately tragic film, and aroused the ire of rivals like Keke Rosberg who used to hit him on the head in passing and whom Byrne openly calls ‘a dick.’ He got to drive for F1’s McLaren team at a time when they had the best car going but his attitude annoyed Ron Dennis. His lifestyle had a major question mark over it, with no money to pay his way into the sport, he took forms of sponsorship which led to his socialising in extremely dodgy company. His car was switched and he lost his drive, in every sense of the term. Instead of hanging around in Europe as Eddie Jordan suggests he should have done, he decamped to the US where he was top driver in his class and seconds away from seizing the 1989 triple crown and getting a free ride into IndyCars, another driver crashed into him and his dream was over: he lost the $80,000 winnings and his marriage hit the skids. He went to Mexico where he consorted with more gangsters, did drugs and whores and messed up all over as he drove his career into the ground. His sponsor was found dead in a swimming pool. Byrne spent a long time drinking, smoking weed and collecting ferns for a living while living in a trailer. It took years for him to get back in the driving world where he works training young up and coming champions. He could have been a contender. He should have been winning in F1. But he’s alive to tell the tale.  His current wife says she believes the sadness is still with him. Produced by David Burke and directed by Sean O’Cualain, this is just an amazing story, compellingly told, with a cast of interviewees known to every petrolhead and there’s the charismatic Byrne himself in the middle of the action, supplying VHS archives of the glory days.

Loving (2016)

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A true story about a case that came to stand for the end of miscegenation laws, this biographical drama directed by the gifted Jeff Nichols exemplifies why it is so tough to dramatise issues concerning people of limited articulacy. Poor white construction worker Richard Loving (Joel Edgerton) marries his pregnant black girlfriend (Ruth Negga) whom he has known since childhood when they were growing up in a pocket of Virginia. Someone rats them out to the police (we never find out who, or how they might be related or connected with them) and Sheriff Marton Csokas puts them in jail for the weekend when he finds them in bed together. They take a deal to move out of state to Washington DC for 25 years but Csokas finds out when they come back to have their son. They commence a tentative legal challenge through a young inexperienced lawyer from the ACLU and move back to Virginia, quietly bringing up their family on a remote farm. Nothing much happens. Then the case goes to the Supreme Court. While Nichols is great at building tension and atmosphere and the threat of violence which never materialises, the narrative is so slight and the occasionally incomprehensible monosyllabic delivery so rare as to test the patience. There is a coy avoidance of both the couple’s intimacy and the legal fight itself – which rather begs the question about the content and aesthetic rationale. A huge burden is thereby placed on the shoulders of the taciturn protagonists who acquit themselves really well and Nichols regulars Bill Camp and Michael Shannon liven up proceedings. But the more I see of Csokas the more I wish someone would give him a lead. He’s great. This merely runs out of story:  it’s at least 25 minutes too long. Adapted from a book by Nancy Buirski.

Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo (1977)

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It’s a wet miserable windy horrible day in the Easter vacation and it’s two whole DAYS until the F1 Grand Prix in Bahrain so what better way to while away 100 minutes than in the company of the affable Dean Jones and the coolest car this side of KITT? Here we start racing in Laguna and Monterey then wind up in Paris and Monte-Carlo with diamonds in the trunk. Groovy cars, cool locations, mellow mystery. Hell yeah!