Sleepless in Seattle (1993)

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Those were the days when people knew how to be in love. Jeff Arch’s story was a meta discourse about people’s views of love and relationships being mediated by the movies. Nora Ephron turned it into a valentine to An Affair to Remember, a 1957 movie starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr. Together with her sister Delia it became as much com as rom, but it still has a baseline of melancholy and that killer feeling, bittersweet. Sam (Tom Hanks) is the widowed architect whose son Jonah (Ross Malinger) wants him to find The One so he can have a mother again. They live in Seattle. Annie (Meg Ryan) is the very proper journalist in Baltimore who gets engaged to the allergy-afflicted Walter (Bill Pullman).  She hears Jonah on a late night radio phone-in and stops at a diner where the waitresses talk of nothing else but this sweet  guy whose son wants him to remarry. She thinks there’s a story there but there’s more, as her friend  (Rosie O’Donnell) figures when her newly affianced friend is so distracted.  While she vaguely plans to hunt down Sam and carry out some friendly stalking, he starts to date again and his son is disgusted by his choice, one of his co-workers. Sam and Annie see each other across a crowded road when she nearly gets hit by a couple of trucks. Her letter to him asks him to meet at the top of the Empire State building on Valentine’s Day a la Cary and Deborah and it’s sent by Becky without her knowledge.  Things pick up when Jonah flies to NYC to keep the date and she’s there having dinner with Walter during a romantic weekend at The Plaza … The tropes from When Harry Met Sally are here – the mirroring conversations, the advice from friends, the movie references, and even that film’s director Rob Reiner plays Sam’s friend and even though she’ d already made a movie this was what really made Nora Ephron as an auteur. It’s a clever premise, discursive as well as fairytale, positing the idea that even though they’re a country apart a pair of compatible people are destined to meet. Eventually. Isn’t that wild? Separating a romantic couple until the very last five minutes of a film?! What a risk! With a helping hand from fate, a kid and a dream of finding love on Valentine’s Day, it helps that this hits three holiday celebrations including Christmas and New Year’s.  It shouldn’t work but it does, helped with some tart lines about men and women and what people settle for as opposed to what everyone really wants. What a dream team, boosted by some wonderful songs. Irresistible.

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The Holiday (2006)

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What a cast. And it’s seasonal too! Christmas in April, as Preston Sturges didn’t write (for him it happened in July…) This is writer/director Nancy Meyers’ most explicitly essayistic film about love – and movies. Kate’s a society columnist in London in love with engaged Rufus Sewell, who wants her as his mistress;  Cameron is the LA trailer-maker shacked up with cheating Ed Burns.  They swap homes for the vacation and love turns up on their respective doorsteps.  One learns to cry for the first time in years, the  other learns to stop. Meyers takes knowing swipes at Hollywood genres, gets these impressive professional high-achieving women to rewrite the conventional ending and leaves us all with serious home envy (I have Kate’s, I want Cameron’s.) As in all of Meyer’s films, this is knowingly subversive with some home truths and life lessons (many coming from the wonderful Eli Wallach, the screenwriter neighbour who hasn’t worked since 1978) and there’s a surprise walk-on from Dustin Hoffman not to mention the stars of the film-within-a-film (alright, I won’t!). A film that repays repeat viewings. And if you want to read more about Meyers and her work I’ve written a book that takes you from her debut, Private Benjamin (1980) through It’s Complicated (2009). Pathways of Desire:  Emotional Architecture in the Films of Nancy Meyers is for sale on Amazon.  https://www.amazon.com/Pathways-Desire-Emotional-Architecture-Meyers-ebook/dp/B01BYFC4QW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1474803514&sr=8-1&keywords=elaine+lennon.