Support Your Local Sheriff (1969)

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I’ve never made any secret of the fact that basically I’m on my way to Australia. Calendar Colorado is lawless town rich on the proceeds of a gold find during a funeral and it needs someone to pull it into shape. A sharpshooting chancer Jason McCullough (James Garner) claiming to be on his way to Oz takes a well-paid job to clean up as sheriff, hired by mayor Olly Perkins (Harry Morgan). That involves putting the Danby family in line so he imprisons idiot son Joe (Bruce Dern) in a jail without bars by dint of a chalk line and some red paint … This sendup of western tropes gets by on its good nature and pure charm with Garner backed up by a hilarious Joan Hackett as the accident-prone Prudy Perkins whose attractions are still visible even when she sets her own bustle alight. Jack Elam parodies his earlier roles as the tough guy seconded as deputy while Walter Brennan leads the dastardly Danbys, hellbent on making money from the guys mining the gold before it can be shipped out. Written and produced by William Bowers and directed by Burt Kennedy, that expert at a comic take on the genre whose serious side he had exploited in collaboration with Budd Boetticher and Randolph Scott the previous decade. Bright and funny entertainment.

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The Far Country (1954)

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I don’t need other people. I don’t need help. I can take care of myself. Cowboy Jeff Webster (James Stewart) is bringing cattle from Wyoming to the Yukon but the corrupt sheriff in Skagway (John McIntire) steals the herd. Jeff joins forces with the saloon keeper (Ruth Roman) from a neighbouring town but they’re up against someone so tough he kills Jeff’s sidekick (Walter Brennan) and Jeff finally swears revenge for reasons other than his own. Great 50s western that has a political undertow – the journey from individual to collective responsibility. Somehow, director Anthony Mann’s construction and use of painted backdrops combine to undermine the film’s radical message while Stewart (in their fourth collaboration) adds another hue of psychopathy to his character palette. With Corinne Calvet as the young woman who must compete with Roman for Stewart’s affections, this is pretty fantastic entertainment and it looks wonderful (they knew colour then). Written by Borden Chase.

Django (1966)

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What an iconic piece of work by the Italian auteur Sergio Corbucci, this spawned loads of imitators (c30) but none holds a candle to this nor stars that most beauteous of men, Franco Nero, except a very late ‘sequel’ in 1987, made without Corbucci. Of course it was influenced by Leone’s work but gained a major following for its equally laconic leading man who fought for the Union but is now drifting, dragging a coffin, in the company of a half-caste whore Maria (Loredana Nusciak) and becoming involved in a dispute between Confederate racists and Mexican revolutionaries. What can be in that coffin? All is revealed in highly symbolic fashion, with fighting in the streets and the graveyards. Exceptionally violent. What a delight it was to see Nero pop up in Django Unchained, but… The original and the best.

 

Posse From Hell (1961)

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Even if it’s not vintage Audie, it’s better than none, right? Four Death Row inmates escape and ride into a town called Paradise, shooting it up, and taking Helen (Zohra Lampert) hostage after she tries to take her alkie uncle home. But gunfighter Banner Cole (Audie) has already been deputised by the wounded sheriff and he leads a posse to rescue the hostages. Amongst the random inexperienced gathering is a bank teller Seymour (John Saxon) who makes the best coffee around and former Army captain Jeremiah (Robert Keith) who mistakes four cowhands for the gang and nearly kills them. Helen’s shame at being raped means she doesn’t want to return to the town. Then they track down the gang to a house and all hell breaks loose… Damned fine coffee!

River of No Return (1954)

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Marilyn Monroe didn’t want to make this. Director Otto Preminger didn’t want to direct it. They both had contracts to fulfill at Twentieth Century Fox under Darryl F. Zanuck and he brooked no opposition. Monroe believed she was better than the material but weirdly had no confidence in her acting abilities – she wanted a coach at all times;  paradoxically DFZ had more belief than she did. She wanted to be taken seriously, he thought Cinemascope and Technicolor showed her to great advantage. We see both sides of this argument. There was trouble on set but Mitchum knew Monroe through her first husband during WW2 so he at least was a friend. She has several songs – one forgets that she sang so much in her films.She’s a saloon singer whose fiance Rory Calhoun wants to make good on a gold claim that’s not his and he leaves her with settler Mitchum and his young son, with whom he’s been reunited, who knew her from the mining camp. Indians burn them out and they take off on a raft downriver to find the welshing no-good  SOB and MM fibs about her intentions and just might know more about Mitchum than she’s letting on …Monroe’s costumes and makeup were a source of concern (but boy does she fill a pair of Levis) and she looks ill at ease in the big dialogue scenes but holds her own despite the ludicrous enunciation which drama coach Nathasha Lytess insisted upon and hurts her performance:  Preminger was shooting wide and didn’t break up the shots. Some of them are plain odd. The more you look at Monroe’s filmography the more you realise how narrow her roles were and even as Fox’s biggest moneymaker she was refused a Star dressing room. Just what did she do to deserve that?