The Wild and the Innocent (1959)

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Aka The Buckskin Kid and the Calico Gal/The Wild Innocents. The Lord sure made a mistake letting people like you have children. Naive young fur trapper Yancy Hawks (Audie Murphy) heads to Casper, Wyoming for the first time when his injured uncle asks him to trade some pelts for essential provisions. He encounters the Stockers, a family of vagabonds headed by lazy sneak thief Ben (Strother Martin) who try to cheat him into parting with his furs in exchange for their daughter Rosalie (Sandra Dee). Rosalie escapes her cruel family and she heads to Casper with Yancy who reluctantly agrees to take her with him but they go through many hardships in the corrupt and lawless big town especially when they fall foul of a crooked sheriff Paul Bartell (Gilbert Roland) who proposes that Rosalie work in a dance hall run by Marcy Howard (Joanne Dru).  When Yancy finds out it’s actually a brothel the scene is set for a showdown … Why don’t you go back to the hills and grow up. An offbeat comedy western written by producer Sy Gomberg and director Jack Sher, the chance to see Dee in a frightwig while Murphy attempts to play it straight is too much to pass up. Roland and Dru excel in their baddie roles, Jim Backus gets to play a decent father figure/shopkeeper and the Cinemascope Eastmancolor Universal experience of Big Bear and Snow Valley is enlivened by Hans Salter’s score and the song Touch of Pink because I Shot the Sheriff hadn’t been written yet. There’s just a chance that you might be what I need

Come September (1961)

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Ah the Sixties, when romcoms were glossy and mainly inoffensive and women wore beautiful clothes without being slut-shamed. Stanley Shapiro and Maurice Richlin wrote a few of them for Doris Day at Universal and in the midst of that deluge and immediately before Richlin started writing the Pink Panther series, someone thought it’d be a busman’s holiday to set a movie in Italy because Liguria, Lazio and Milano are pretty great places to shoot a movie. With Rock Hudson as the home owner coming back to resume his relationship with La Lollo only to find she’s got another guy and his major domo (Walter Slezak) is making money on the side by using it as a hotel in his absence and Lo! Bobby Darin and his gang are making moves on Sandra Dee and her posse. Bobby sings Multiplication. Gosh, they really don’t make them like this any more. Lovely, light entertainment.