Blue Murder at St Trinians (1957)

Blue Murder at St Trinians theatrical poster

A very deftly plotted entry in the Launder and Gilliat series adapted from Ronald Searle’s riotous school stories, this sees Amelia Fritton (Alastair Sim) in prison and with the school under military and police control, the girls contrive to win a bus trip to Europe and the father (Lionel Jeffries) of one of them returns in Ms Fritton’s place when he needs to hide out following a heist at Hatton Garden. With Terry-Thomas romancing Joyce Grenfell, George Cole doing his inimitable best as ‘Flash’ Harry running a marriage agency to get the sixth formers hitched, it’s all systems go for the anarchic crew. Bedlam, in  other words. Great fun.

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The Green Man (1956)

The Green Man big poster.jpg

It’s pouring rain and freezing cold so it’s time for an afternoon of Olde Englishe films. What a joy it is to see the Launder and Gilliat logo at the top of a title sequence! And then the credits roll up and the names just delight: Alastair Sim, George Cole, Terry-Thomas. Terry-Thomas!!!! Bliss. This is the one where Sim winds up preferring his work as a hitman to the day job. When he gets the call to off a politician all manner of people get in his way.When L&G first wrote this as a play in 1937 the hitman was a minor character but in its various gestations it became the leading role and thank goodness Sim was around to play it. Directed by Robert Day – with uncredited assistance from Basil Dearden because of disagreements with Sim, who wanted to direct it himself.  This is a non-stop, droll, comic delight of pratfalls, missed opportunities and genteel Englishness. Like I said, bliss.