Gallipoli (1981)

Gallipoli movie poster.jpg

How fast can you run? How fast are you going to run? How odd that in 1981 two period ¬†films about athletes should have a contemporary soundtrack for the running sequences … for this was the year that also brought Britflick Chariots of Fire with a Vangelis score, released 6 months earlier. It’s World War 1. Teenage Western Australian sprinter Archy (Mark Lee) persuades rival Frank (Mel Gibson) to join up with him and an extended period of time focuses on their training for the ANZACs in Egypt. When we get to the Turkish battlefield we can feel the heat and dust and our immersion is in no little part due to the production and sound design and editing, a marvel of achievement. There might be those who carp at some historical inaccuracies about the Battle of the Nek but for Australians this episode of senseless killing looms large in the psyche and was revisited recently by Russell Crowe in his directing debut, The Water Diviner. Playwright David Walliamson’s screenplay was inspired by a book by Bill Gammage on the subject: we can infer that the purpose of the sprinters in the trenches to communicate with the Poms has an allegorical function beyond the immediately dramatic. Jean-Michel Jarre’s Oxygene is used to extraordinary effect amongst all the other classical pieces and new music by Brian May (the Australian composer who scored Mad Max). Russell Boyd’s cinematography is simply superb. Gibson of course became a megastar on the strength of this and Mad Max. It was a tough film to get funded and Weir’s initial proposed story did not go down well. Rupert Murdoch came to the rescue. Peter Weir is a great director who makes incredibly poetic mainstream films and doesn’t work enough as far as I’m concerned. I love everything he does. You will not forget the freeze frame finale in a hurry.

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