Cape Fear (1962)

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From my limited knowledge of human nature, Max Cady isn’t a man who makes idle threats. After an eight-year prison sentence for rape, Max Cady (Robert Mitchum) targets Sam Bowden (Gregory Peck), one of the lawyers who sent him away. When Max finds Sam and his family, he begins a terrifying stalking spree, intending to ruin Sam’s life. Desperate to protect his wife Peggy (Polly Bergen) and daughter Nancy (Lori Martin), Sam makes every effort to send Max back to jail. But when his attempts fail, Sam realizes that he must take matters into his own hands if he wants to rid his life of Max for good after he targets his family and makes the lewdest of provocative suggestions to the Councillor …  The great John D. MacDonald’s novel The Executioners was adapted by James R. Webb and director J. Lee Thompson turns the whole kit and caboodle into something absolutely sensational:  a crime thriller that has an extraordinary pair of performances at its helm and a great sense of place. Peck (reunited with his Guns of Navarone helmer) is the relentlessly decent family man driven to violence and Mitchum is extraordinary as the horrifically lascivious crim who says and does everything imaginable to torture him, playing the system to its limits for all it’s worth while Martin Balsam and Telly Savalas are on both their tails. Brilliantly shot, paced and designed and totally enervating. Fabulous.

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Mother’s Day (2016)

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Mother’s Day is a thing now? Wow. More cards and festival-type activities. Speaking of Garry Marshall, who we love(d), he spent the last number of years doing these multi-strand dramedies with a few top-lining stars and a lot of… B listers. This sadly is his last directing gig and it’s … actors doing their best with middling material. Sandy (Jennifer Aniston) is the stressed-out single divorced mom of two boys whose ex has married a teenager (sort of). She can’t deal with the whole sexy stepmom thing. Friend Jesse (Kate Hudson) is married to an Indian without her folks knowing. (They’re in Texas constantly on the road in their RV – maybe…) Her sister Gabi (Sarah Chalke)  is shacked up with a woman with a sperm-donated child. She’s pretending to be engaged to a man. And there’s a playground friend Kristin (Britt Robertson) who’s shacked up with her boyfriend Zack (Brit comic Jack Whitehall) but won’t marry him despite their having a child. She says it’s because she’s adopted. More likely because she’s not old enough. Julia Roberts is the TV hostess with the mostess on a shopping channel shucking mood pendants to them all (we are in Georgia, home shopping channel capital of the world as we know from JLaw’s mop movie). Bradley (Jason Sudeikis) is the gym proprietor widower with two teenaged daughters who can’t stop looking at his late wife (Jennifer Garner) singing karaoke in videos recorded before her death on military duty. It’s been a year now so why isn’t he dating? Oh dear God why? Why not? Who cares? I hope they all had a good old time taking advantage of the State of Georgia’s generous movie tax incentives. It looks like a very nice place. I admit this PC sludge isn’t as bad as that awful multi-generational crud Christmas With the Coopers but this was no way for Marshall to go out. He made The Flamingo Kid for crying out loud! Stick a pin in me, call me a pinata, I’m done.

Leave Her to Heaven (1945)

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An extraordinary film in so many ways. A woman bewitches a man and ruins his life. Or does he destroy hers? She is Gene Tierney, a performer whose legacy is little recognised today but she had a great run in the 1940s. He is Cornel Wilde, a mild presence at best, perfectly suited as the mediocre writer who doesn’t quite know what he’s getting into by marrying a woman whose father he closely resembles. Or does he? She walks out on her fiance, she marries him instead, kills his crippled brother in a scene that remains one of the best ever filmed and then she kills their unborn child and THEN … frames him for her own murder after she discovers his love for her cousin, brought up as her adoptive sister and to whom he has dedicated his latest book. She might be one of the most evil women who ever lived in anyone’s imagination, or one of the most wronged. After all, didn’t he want her as a muse? And then dragged all manner of people into their domestic environment. She says early on, Every book’s a confession. And he is wanting for inspiration. Jo Swerling was enlisted by fabled producer Darryl F. Zanuck to adapt Ben Ames Williams’ bestselling novel which Tierney read and then petitioned for the role. Amazing houses, wonderful cinematography by Leon Shamroy, sublime costuming (Kay Nelson with a helping hand from Oleg Cassini) and effective direction by John M. Stahl, responsible for so many terrific melodramas. This is framed as a film noir with its flashback narration but really belongs in that genre. Tierney is genius.