Mrs Pym of Scotland Yard (1940)

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Nigel Morland’s series got one outing at least on film in this witty fast-moving episode in which the eccentric (code for overweight and smart) lady detective (Mary Clare) uncovers the plot behind the murders of two women who had visited the same (fake) medium at a psychic club. These stories began in the great era of detective fiction – between the wars – and the London setting is part of the attraction, not to mention having Mrs Pym outwit the commissioner at the Yard (Robert English). The psychic scenes are exceptionally well staged despite the low budget, it looks great and there’s the joy of seeing the deceiver’s assistant Miss Bell (Irene Handl) constantly hiding in cupboards. Richard Loddon (Nigel Patrick) is the journo interested in the story and romancing the woman set to be the next victim, Maraday Wood (Janet Johnson), who has a very healthy bank balance. Unusually for a Brit flick there are even shots fired and people murdered! The fact that a vacuum cleaner is involved is what is likely responsible for Clare’s good humour in the role.  She was one of Noel Coward’s favourite actresses and is probably best known to Hitchcock buffs as the sinister baroness in The Lady Vanishes – she also had a role as the mother in Young and Innocent. For fans of British cinema she was in both versions of Hindle Wakes and The Constant Nymph. With Edward Lexy as Detective-Inspector Shott and Anthony Ireland as Henry Menchen. Morland adapted his own character and director Fred Ellis and Peggy Barwell wrote the screenplay. Funny and enjoyable.

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Jassy (1947)

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Norah Lofts’ novel got the full Gainsborough gothic melodrama treatment with director Bernard Knowles reuniting some of the stars of A Place of One’s Own and a screenplay adapted by Dorothy Christie & Campbell Christie and Geoffrey Kerr.  It was the first script ready to go when Sydney Box took over from Maurice Ostrer at the studio. Barney (Dermot Walsh) is the son of a dissolute squire (Dennis Price) who gambles away their wonderful country house Mordelaine and he befriends psychic gypsy Jassy (Margaret Lockwood) whom he rescues from a mob at a ducking pond. She knows the moment her beloved father is shot by the property’s new owner, Nick Helmar (Basil Sydney), and Helmar divorces his unfaithful wife. Jassy gets work as a maid at a school where Helmar’s daughter Dilys (Patricia Roc) befriends her and eventually takes her home as a companion, and Helmar gets her to run the household economically and then marries her when Dilys runs off to be with Barney’s rival, Stephen. Jassy recruits a disabled mute woman Elizabeth (Cathleen Nesbitt) to the household and when Helmar expresses displeasure at Jassy’s refusal to have sex with him – she’s had him sign over the house to her – Elizabeth starts poisoning him. Jassy goes on trial for his murder… Fabulously vivid tosh, with a luminous Lockwood (never mind Lindsay Anderson!) and a young Nesbitt getting a good opportunity for some last-minute courtroom histrionics in the studio’s only Technicolor production, shot by Geoffrey Unsworth. Lots of familiar faces – Linden Travers, Maurice Denham, Ernest Thesiger, Torin Thatcher et al enliven this overegged story.